To Crater Lake and other nice places with the Ducati Multistrada

This post is written in memory of my Uncle André Benito D’Agord (Tio Benito).

After several days of rainy and cold weather I was more than ready to ride when things cleared on the weekend’s weather forecast. And to compensate the time I was away from riding, my plan was to go far. What about a 600 mile loop for Sunday, April 20th?  But I played soccer Saturday and one of my buddies missed the timing on a tackle and knocked me down, blocking my left foot, forcing it to a sudden stop, sideways, provoking an about 90 degrees sideways torsion to my ankle. First thing I thought when I realized the damage to my ankle was that I wouldn’t be able to ride Sunday as planned! And the bike was all nice and clean and ready to go the distance with two GPS’s, the touring screen and a full tank of non-ethanol gasoline.  All dressed up and nowhere to go.

Why only two GPS's? Because three would be too much And I only have two of these things.

Why only two GPS’s? Because three would be too much Or because I only have two of these things.

Saturday evening the pain in my ankle was a solid 5 on a 1-10 scale, but then I woke up Sunday morning feeling better and decided to try on my riding boots. I put them on, tightened it up and I could put my left foot down and it held my weight okay and without (much) pain and I could walk (with a limp). So let’s go for a ride. By the time I made this decision it was already late for my 600 miles plan, so I decided on a shorter route, via Hwy 58 in the general direction of my original plan, the Crater Lake, minus a few hundred miles of detours. And the idea was to re-evaluate at some point and decide if I could go as far as Crater Lake or not.

Got the beautiful bike ready to go! Let's see how far can I go.

Got the beautiful bike ready to go! Let’s see how far can I go.

I first needed to know how I would mount the bike, using my left foot as the pivot to swing my right leg.  Well, it worked okay with only minor pain. I started carefully down the road, afraid when stopping, when I would touch the ground with my left foot, I had visions of my ankle collapsing, taking me and the bike down. So the idea would be to always when stopping use only my right foot to support the bike. In the end, no problems at all, left or right foot stops, except for that psychologically induced fear that never quite went away in the first several stops. My first stop was at Dexter Lake, to check out the Animal House film’s club where the guys were beaten up when they showed up at that club, unannounced and with that pseudo-conquer-it-all quasi-frat attitude.

Dexter Lake Club, portrayed in the Animal House film

Dexter Lake Club, portrayed in the Animal House film

Next stop was Oakridge, where I filled up the tank. Oakridge has been through a renovation in its approach to business in the last few years.  From a run down logging town it discovered mountain biking a few years ago (or mountain biking discovered Oakridge), becoming a leader in this type of sport and one of the meccas for mountain biking in the region.  There is also a brewery and other attractions.  Hoping it continues its resurgence. Check here to read an article on NPR about Oakridge and its transition from a lumber town to becoming a Mountain Biking destination.

There is also a very good documentary, Pedal Driven, about how mountain biking gained space in the western region, it includes a description of the area around Oakridge.

Willamette Valley Mercantile in Oakridge, Oregon.

Willamette Valley Mercantile in Oakridge, Oregon.

I used to race cross country mountain bikes when I lived in Ohio. I still have a couple of mountain bikes, maybe I should get them ready and ride the Oakridge trails some day this summer. Larison Rock and Creek trails are on old growth forest areas, I hear. In the summer, when it all gets dry that area must be a really nice place to ride a mountain bike.

From Oakridge I continued up and southeast on Hwy 58 and soon I learned the tunnel is still under construction with traffic in only one lane. I made my third stop at the Willamette pass and found out the ski season is over.

Willamette Pass - Ski season is over. April 21st, 2013

Willamette Pass – Ski season is over. April 21st, 2013

This is at about a 5,000 ft elevation, it was a bit chilly here, low 40’s.  But I knew it would only get worse from now on, towards the Crater Lake at something more than 6,000 ft of elevation.  By this time here I had completely forgotten about my left ankle and that painful soccer injury.

Next stop was at the entrance to the Crater Lake National Park.  The West entrance was the only way to the park this time of the year.  It starts from Hwy 62, so I had to do an extra set of miles to get there.  The north entrance, the one closest to where I was coming from, was still closed, blocked by a wall of snow.

West Entrance to the Crater Lake National Park. April 21st, 2013

West Entrance to the Crater Lake National Park. April 21st, 2013

I continued up and soon I was there, walls of snow on both sides of the road. At the top the store was open, a few tourists around, we were all confined in a small area of the park, the only areas where the roads are kept clear of the snow.

Walls of Snow. Crater Lake National Park, April 21st, 2013

Walls of Snow. Crater Lake National Park, April 21st, 2013

The lake is always beautiful, no matter the time of the year you go there.

Crater Lake in the Spring. April 21st, 2013

Crater Lake in the Spring. April 21st, 2013

An opportunity to photograph the bike with the snow.

The Multistrada and the Snow. Crater Lake, Oregon. April 21st, 2013

The Multistrada and the Snow. Crater Lake, Oregon. April 21st, 2013

Soon all these roads will be open and I will come back for a proper visit to Crater Lake.  By the way, I was here a few other times before. And I have a report of my visit to Crater Lake, last year, with the Triumph.

Te road that goes around the rim, closed April 21st, 2013

Te road that goes around the rim, closed April 21st, 2013

The Rogues river goes from north to south on the west side of the Crater Lake. I followed it for a while, I was traveling north, the river is traveling south in this area.

Rogue River

Rogue River

My goal was to reach Hwy 138, and follow the Umpqua river down to the Willamette valley and from there I would be home quickly.

Non-ethanol fuel in Diamond Lake.

Non-ethanol fuel in Diamond Lake.

I checked the lake itself, and it was still somewhat frozen.

Diamond Lake still somewhat frozen

Diamond Lake still somewhat frozen

Yes, the bike was there too.

Diamond Lake, somewhere behind the bike.

Diamond Lake, somewhere behind the bike.

I asked it to move so I could take a more decent picture of the lake.

Diamond Lake. April 21st, 2013

Diamond Lake. April 21st, 2013

The weather is not looking too good, as you can see from the pictures. I felt a few drops of rain, and it was getting late, so let’s go home! From here I’m a good 175 miles from home, so it would be a long way.  But, my friends, Hwy 138 is a treat for a motorcyclist. Besides great curves, it is beautiful following the Umpqua river, with nice rock formations on both sides of the valley carved by the river. On my other report about the Crater Lake I reported some pictures from this road.  Today, with the possibility of rain I decided to just go down the cascades towards the valley.  Eventually the weather cleared and I stopped to check Watson Falls.  Can you see it up there on the very top?

Watson Falls

Watson Falls

I tried to hike towards the falls, but my foot did not cooperate. It was actually not bad, but I thought about the damage I could be generating. But I walked a little bit towards the falls on a nice, well groomed trail.

Typical Cascades creek and falls.

Typical Cascades creek and falls.

Continuing west, I stopped to check the river by the Horseshoe Bend.

The Umpqua River by the Horsehoe Bend

The Umpqua River by the Horsehoe Bend

And from there all the way to the valley. I took the North Bank Rd., a nice short cut to Hwy 99 where I would go north towards Eugene.

North Bank, on the Umpqua River.

North Bank, on the Umpqua River.

When I stopped here I checked my phone and I noticed my father had tried calling me several times.  It was already too late for me to call them back, they are four hours ahead.  But I thought something had gone wrong.  I made a quick stop in Oakland. It was rather empty today.

Oakland, Oregon

Oakland, Oregon

Continuing north on old Hwy 99, the plan was to cross I-5 towards Drain and from there find Territorial and Lorane Hwy back home.  But then I came across these wild turkeys by the road.

Turkeys along the road.

Turkeys along the road.

And worse yet, deer.

Deer

Deer

It was getting dark, the deer were becoming active, I thought I would be better off taking I-5 and doing the last 40 miles on the slab.  I really don’t like riding on a freeway, but I believe it was the safest bet at that time.

400 miles

400 miles

That 125 mph must be an error… What matters is that this was a nice long trip in this nice motorcycle.  I was out riding for 8 hours and a half, 400 miles of fun.  I realized the regular screen does not do the job well when you ride at speeds higher than 60 mph.  I will install the Pikes Peak shorty screen. I think it does a lot better in terms of wind turbulence. It may protect less against the elements, but clear wind is a better deal than chopped wind in terms of noise.

Back home.

Back home.

And once again we made it home safely.  I put the bike in the garage, went inside and got the news that my uncle, my father’s brother, had passed away.  André (Tio Benito) D’Agord died peacefully while taking his afternoon nap, at about the same time I was on my way to Crater Lake, this last Sunday, April 21, 2013. Tio Benito was born in November 30, 1931, had a long live but lived quietly and in somewhat close boundaries. I don’t know if he had ever left our state, Rio Grande do Sul. But I know his mind traveled to many places. He never asked much off life or anyone. But the few things he asked off me, I tried to oblige. When I saw him in April of 2012 he asked me for a postcard from Oregon. When I saw him again a few months later, in November of 2012, I gave him a few postcards from Oregon. One of them was of the Crater Lake. Whenever I travel again to Crater Lake I will think about Tio Benito and his gentle soul. Rest in peace Tio Benito!

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4 Responses to To Crater Lake and other nice places with the Ducati Multistrada

  1. Trobairitz says:

    Wow, I’ve never thought of Crater Lake as being a day trip away – but you went and did it. In the chilly weather too.

    Very nice pictures. Crater Lake is beautiful as always, but better with a bike in the picture.

    Hope your ankle is all healed.

    • cesardagord says:

      Thanks Trobairitz. My ankle is still healing, slowly, no soccer for me yet.
      I actually always thought of Crater Lake as a trip that involved an overnight stay as well. Until a friend of mine casually mentioned he had just returned from Crater Lake, a day ride on his KLR. I was thinking of an even longer ride, actually, just to check how the bike behaved (or how I fared) on long day rides.
      Cesar

  2. bob skoot says:

    Cessar:

    So sorry about your Uncle. At least he was in his sleep. If you had to choose, that would be the best way. Crater Lake would be a 2 day trip for us just to get there. Can’t believe all the ice and snow there but the roads were clear, which was good for you

    I haven’t been there for a long time, but it was in our previous Corvette and then we headed towards Crescent City. I am itching to go there by bike next time but it will have to be next year, as this year is already planned and committed to.

    I know you are liking your bike a lot. I intend to do longer rides on my R1200R. I am still getting it ready for this years vacation.

    Hope your ankle is getting better. I hurt my ankle many years ago and I get recurring pain sometimes. Today is one of those sometimes but it comes and goes. Generally when I put on my riding boots it helps to stabilize and gives more support. Glad to see that Nothing happened and you got home safely

    bob
    Riding the Wet Coast

    • cesardagord says:

      Thank you Bob – and I’m glad to hear from you. Yes, going on his sleep was the best scenario. My grandmother, his mother, went the same way, on an afternoon nap. I’m avoiding naps now. Just kidding.
      Anyway, yes for you, coming from BC, Crater Lake needs to be a two day trip, even in the comfort of an air-conditioned Corvette.
      Today I just got back from a 273 mile journey on the Multistrada. It is just getting better. Ad your R1200R should be a fun bike, it is my favorite BMW boxer bike, in terms of size, application and looks.
      My ankle still bothers me, who knows when it will heal… No soccer yet. My next post will be about a very fun bike, the Ducati Hyperstrada. What fun it was to ride it!

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