Pacific Coast Loop – March 2014

The weekend before last I ran into my friend Ricardo and his wife at a local grocery store. I had not seen him for a while, as we usually see each other on the soccer pitch and both of us are out on injuries for quite a while. Getting old sucks. Anyway, I got an invitation for dinner from them, and then Ricardo and I talked about riding.  And we made it happen. Yesterday Doug and Ricardo showed up at my house and we went for a ride.

Setting up for a ride. Saturday, March 15th

Setting up for a ride. Saturday, March 15th

We stopped at the gas station with the non-ethanol pump on 99 and Irving and there was a long line for that good pump. It was the beginning of a nice weekend and people were getting the good gasoline for their toys or for the small motors of machines involved in yard work. Soon it will be warm enough that boaters will be lining up for the good gas as well.

We took 36 to Territorial, to Monroe, and from Monroe we took Alpine road all the way to Alsea.  At some point on Alpine road Ricardo thought his front tire needed air, so we stopped at the gas station in Alsea.

Checking air pressure on front tire of the Super Duke.

Checking air pressure on front tire of the Super Duke.

Tire air pressure was okay. We think it probably was the Alpine road pulling its tricks. Despite the appearance of being clean, it is a seldom used road, I would say it is not the best surface for traction may give that wondering feel upfront. All was good, we carried on to the coast via 36.

Alsea Mercantile, in Alsea, of course.

Alsea Mercantile, in Alsea, of course.

We hit the coast and made a left on 101 and went straight to Yachats. This time I suggested we went elsewhere other than Ona for lunch.  But Doug and Ricardo were set on Ona.  Fine with me.

The three  bikes at Ona's parking area

The three bikes at Ona’s parking area

Doug ordered the two-eggs with bacon and the server told Ricardo and I, both of us ordered the Manila Clam chowder, that we would be envious of Doug’s order.  And she was right, it was quite a plate, the bacon looked really fresh.  It looked really good even when the Manila Clam chowder with a couple of slices of freshly baked bread is a great choice.

During one of my loops I went next door to Ona, to this joint (photo below) for a greasy burger. Perfect for a cold day and it matches better a biker atmosphere. But they took a long time to serve and the food at Ona is far better.

The "joint" next door

The “joint” next door

This time there was no rain at this part of the loop, just a heavy ocean mist, enough to require wiping the visor regularly.  We stopped for one quick photo shoot of the ocean.

The forever eroding Oregon coast

The forever eroding Oregon coast

Just a minute and we got back on our bikes and got on our way to Florence.

Nicest bike I've ever had...

Nicest bike I’ve ever had…

From Florence we took 126 to Mapleton for a shot of non-ethanol gas. Well, they needed it, not my Ducati.  They did not look too happy when I bragged about my bike’s computer indicating I had another 100 miles to go before the bike would need a fill up. I’ll be more subtle next time. Maybe not.

The KTMs need a refill. The Ducati looks from the distance.

The KTMs need a refill. The Ducati looks from the distance.

We said our goodbyes here. Twenty or so miles down the road the two of them would take the cut-off from 36 to Noti and cross 126 towards Territorial and get to the south Eugene area where they both live.  I would stay on 36 and beyond to Prairie Rd, it is almost a straight shot all the way to my house, on the wrong side of the tracks.  But we rode together all the way to their turn off point and it was quite fun following them. I was really glad I was riding the Ducati, each time I get more comfortable on this bike, trust it more, use it better.  I just don’t like the switchbacks and very tight corners with it. But 2nd or 3rd gear, low-to-mid speed corners it shines. I’m not even mentioning the long and sweeping corners on 4th gear at 5,5K rpm as you open it up at the apex in that sweet spot of the motor. No words to describe the feel, the sound, the experience the machine generates.

I stopped at the Chevron on 99 and Irving and filled it up, it took 4 gallons to fill the tank.  That means the bike made almost 50 mpg. The bike practically had 1 gallon left in the tank, which would be good for another 50 miles or so.  250 miles between fill-ups is not out of question for this bike.  More distance is certainly possible from a full tank if taking it easy.

Back were I started: 4 gallons for the loop

Back were I started: 4 gallons for the loop

A few more miles and I was back home, it was another great day for a ride. About 200 miles completed (the GPS showed 191 miles as it was turned off for a few miles when one of the connectors came lose).

About 200 miles for the day

About 200 miles for the day

I did this entire loop on Urban mode, with 150 High.  I usually do it on Touring or Sport mode, both on 150 high, but with a bit harder suspension setting, especially on Sport mode. I had not slept very well the night before, so I was looking for comfort and not performance. I don’t know what else to say, except that this is an amazing motorcycle. I’m already looking forward to the next time I will take it out for a ride.

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11 Responses to Pacific Coast Loop – March 2014

  1. Rick Pannemann says:

    50 mpg?? My 2011 MTS bests out at around 43; admittedly, I ride with all the luggage on, so that might make a difference. Now, with the full Termi, I’m getting horrible mileage, at least in town. As low as 21 mpg! City driving at low rpms takes its toll on the big twin, I guess. Haven’t yet had the opportunity to take it out on a decent distance ride to know the highway mpg since installing the Termi.

    When you say, Urban, 150 High, what does that refer to? I know in Urban, the engine detunes to 100 hp. Curious what you meant.

    Let me know if you’re ever riding in the Seattle area. We can hit up Whidbey or the Cascade Loop!

    Cheers,
    Rick

    • cesardagord says:

      I will check, but that is how I remember “defaulting” urban settings last year. The dual spark plugs and the re-directed angle of injection have changed this machine for better or smoother acceleration and improved fuel economy. Riding with bags sure takes a toll on MPG, but not too much. I still get higher 40′s. I will definitely let you know if I get to the Seattle area with the Ducati.

      EDIT:

      Rick, check the last photo of this post and magnify it: in the circle area of the dash you will see Urban, 150 High, DTC 06, ABS 03. That’s how I left it last year and it stays that way as my default for the Urban selection. What I get is soft suspension and about an inch lower from sport or touring.

      • Interesting — I wonder if that’s a display mode added to the 2013 models. I’ll have to page through the menu and see what I find on the ’11.

        I suppose my gas mileage could also be impacted by my, ahem, overzealous eating (i.e. I could stand to lose a few pounds). As I say, I’ll take it out for a longer ride — probably this upcoming Sunday — and see what I get.

      • cesardagord says:

        I remember some differences on the circle area of the dash between the 2013 and the previous models. But I thought you would be able to set it at 150 High on the Urban mode on the previous models as well. I’ve ridden a 2010 two or three times, but I never tried that set up, though.

        Well, official specs from Ducati explain the new model has a 10% improved fuel efficiency when compared to the previous model when traveling at “normal” speeds.

  2. bob skoot says:

    Cesar:

    I think I would have gone for the Bacon & Eggs too. When I was riding up the coast Hwy101 last August I stopped for breakfast at a place which had thick bacon slices, so many that I could barely eat them all. Somehow I think it was in Port Orford.

    I remember I had a burger next to the Ona but it was like in the basement and through the window I could see my bike parked in those spaces just West of the building. It was like a pub but I can’t remember the name of the place. Not as nice as the meal we had at the Ona in September when I drove down.

    My Vstrom gets 300+ (miles in city riding 500+ kms) but it was a 23 L tank. My BMW gets much less only about 200+ miles even though the trip computer indicates more but I don’t trust it because when I fill it takes 15L or more and the tank is only 17L. I am not sure is the reserve is included in the 17L or whether it has 4L left. the trip computer computes like it has 4 litres left but as I said, I don’t trust it otherwise I would get 250+ miles too

    See, riding is about food and where to eat. I never even mentioned anything about riding. I made a right turn at Florence and I traveled on some great roads and I even saw the sign to Eugene but I turned North. I thought of you . . .

    Great that you managed two loops already this early in the season. I like your bike too

    bob
    A weekend photographer or Riding the Wet Coast

    • cesardagord says:

      Hey Bob, the reserve should be included in the 17 liters of the tank. In all the bikes I’ve had the amount of reserve is the approximate amount of fuel you have in the tank at the time the amber light turns on. In your case, 4 liters, right? In general, there is a difference between the theoretical volume of the tank and the actual amount of fuel you can put in it (side stand or center stand may make a difference as well).

      • bob skoot says:

        Cesar:

        I would tend to agree with you that the reserve should be included in tank capacity BUT My trip computer during my trip would indicate that I had about 100 kms left but when I filled it would go to nearly 17 litres indicating that I was nearly out of gas, but with the mileage remaining would infer that I still had 4 litres left. There is mixed answers on the R1200R forum. Some say yes, and some say no. But I decided to not take a chance and fill every 350 kms Max (218 miles)

        The next time I will let my tank go until the light goes on, and then fill it up and see how many litres it will take but this may not be until next year. I don’t plan to insure my BMW this year.

        bob
        A weekend photographer or Riding the Wet Coast

      • cesardagord says:

        Hi Bob,
        I did some research… and downloaded the BMW R1200R manual which indicates it has a 18.1 liter tank of “usable” gasoline. I researched “usable” and according to Oregon’s dept. of agriculture, it means what the fuel pump can pick up when the vehicle is level. Unusable relates to the fuel that lies at the bottom of the tank and cannot be picked up by the fuel pump. The reserve of the R1200R is rated at 3.1 liters or more of gasoline. And on all my motorcycles, it indicates the fuel left in the tank when the amber light comes on. Meaning the light should come on after you used 18.1-3.1 = 15 liters of gasoline.
        Cesar

    • bob skoot says:

      Cesar:

      Thank you for doing all this research. The computer must include the un-usable fuel which it shouldn’t. I don’t know why they don’t use a larger tank for a touring bike. My Vstrom gets 100 miles more as it has a 23 L tank

      bob
      A weekend photographer or Riding the Wet Coast

  3. giltavares says:

    Cesar, from a couple of close-up photographs you have posted of your bike it appears as if the front brake reservoir seal has collapsed into the reservoir. Look at the first photo in this blog entry, you can see the black seal has been drawn into the reservoir. If you decide to investigate, place some towels around the area covering any paint, brake fluid is highly corrosive and easily chews up paint.

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